Our board represents the research and technology communities and provides COS with valuable advice for meeting its mission.


Joshua Greenberg

Joshua M. Greenberg

Director, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Digital Information Technology Program

Term: 2013-2017
<p></p><p></p><p>Dr. Greenberg received his Bachelor of Arts in History of Science, Medicine and Technology from the Johns Hopkins University, and both Masters and Doctoral degrees from Cornell University's Department of Science &amp; Technology Studies. His dissertation work on the early history of the consumer videocassette recorder and the invention of the video rental industry was published as "From Betamax to Blockbuster" by the MIT Press (2008). The research was notable for the extensive use of online media to collect oral histories of early video store owners, employees and customers.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p>After completing his graduate work, Dr. Greenberg worked as Associate Director for Research Projects at George Mason University’s Center for History and New Media, as well as Research Assistant Professor in the University’s Department of History and Art History. At CHNM, he co-founded the Zotero project, developed and promoted ways of using the Internet to further historical research, and helped build several systems that eventually evolved into the content management platform Omeka.</p><p>Immediately prior to joining the Foundation, Dr. Greenberg was the New York Public Library's first Director of Digital Strategy and Scholarship, where he developed and led a digital strategy centered on building online visitors and deepening engagement through access to collections both on Library websites and third-party platforms and increased exposure to staff expertise via blogs and other social media.</p><p>He is an active member of the broader digital library and digital humanities communities, serving on a number of advisory boards and program committees, and maintains active research and teaching interests in the history and sociology of information technology, the dynamics of public engagement with expert knowledge, and the methodological implications of new digital technologies for research.</p><p>He has broad experience and understanding of the content and research needs of traditional scholarly communities as well as digitally-networked services and tools to support myriad forms of public engagement and participation.</p><p></p><p></p>

John Ioannidis

John P.A. Ioannidis

C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention at Stanford University

Term: 2014-2016
<p>John P.A. Ioannidis holds the C.F. Rehnborg Chair in Disease Prevention at Stanford University and is Professor of Medicine, Professor of Health Research and Policy, and Director of the Stanford Prevention Research Center (SPRC) at Stanford University School of Medicine, Professor of Statistics (by courtesy) at Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences, one of the two Directors of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS), member of the Stanford Cancer Institute and the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, and affiliate in the Stanford Center on Longevity and the Woods Institute for the Environment.</p>

Heather Joseph

Heather Joseph

Executive Director, The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)

Term: 2015-2016
<p><p><p>Heather Joseph serves as the Executive Director of SPARC, (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition), an international coalition of academic and research libraries working to expand the global, open communication of research and scholarship. She leads the strategic and operational activities of the organization, and has focused SPARC’s efforts on creating and supporting new models for sharing digital articles, data and educational resources. Under her stewardship, SPARC has become widely recognized as the leading international force for effective Open Access policy advocacy, successfully securing legislation and executive actions in the U.S., Canada and Europe.</p></p></p><p><p><p>To support SPARC’s mission, Ms. Joseph spearheaded the launch of the student Right to Research Coalition, an international advocacy organization that has grown to represent nearly seven million students worldwide, and provides opportunities for students and early career researchers to actively engage in advocacy for the open sharing of research and scholarship. She is also the convener of the Alliance for Taxpayer Access, a national coalition of major U.S. education, research and advocacy organizations that advocate for public access to the results of federally funded research.</p><p>Prior to joining SPARC, she spent 15 years as a publishing executive in both commercial and not-for-profit publishing organizations. Ms. Joseph serves on the Board of Directors of a number of non-profit organizations, including the Public Library of Science (PLoS), DuraSpace and the Center for Open Science. She is an active participant in projects and committees at several U.S. federal agencies, and was recently appointed to the Secretary of Commerce’s advisory Council on Digital Data. Ms. Joseph is a frequent speaker and writer on topics relating to opening up access to knowledge.</p></p></p>

Alan Kraut

Alan G. Kraut

Executive Director of the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System

Term: 2016-2018
<p></p><p></p><p>Alan Kraut is the Executive Director of the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System (PCSAS). PCSAS began with one program in 2009 and now has accredited 30 of the best clinical programs in the United States and Canada. Kraut, who served as Executive Director of the Association for Psychological Science (APS) helped create PCSAS beginning in 1992 when APS organized Summit on the Future of Accreditation and first raised the possibility of a new accreditation system. Kraut and APS supported the Academy of Psychological Clinical Science (APCS) — an alliance that then directly created PCSAS.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p>Prior leading PCSAS, Kraut served for 27 years as the founding Executive Director of the Association for Psychological Science (APS) the major organization devoted solely to the interests of research and academic psychology and its contributions to the public interest. Kraut was APS’s first employee and took APS from an initial membership of a few hundred in 1989 to an organization that today has 27,000 members, five leading journals with Psychological Science now the most cited empirical journal among 300 in behavioral science, a premier convention and a reputation as the most effective national (and now very much international) voice for behavioral and psychological science.</p><p>Kraut has more than 30 years of experience as a science and research administrator, advocate, and opinion leader. He is recognized in Washington for his effectiveness in shaping national policy and he often is quoted both in the science press and more general media on science policy.</p><p>It was APS efforts through Kraut that created OppNet, a $120+ mil basic behavioral science research initiative at NIH; a behavioral science directorate at NSF; and established eligibility for scientific clinical psychology in NSF's Graduate Research Fellowship Program. In addition, APS generated articles/stories/columns/blogs are regularly featured in print and online at Newsweek, Time, Huffington Post, Scientific American, New York Times, Wall St. Journal, etc.</p><p>Kraut received his Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Syracuse University in 1977. From 1977-80, he was on the psychology faculty of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, VA. Before establishing APS, Kraut directed various science and policy programs at the American Psychological Association and was APA’s founding Executive Director for Science.</p><p></p><p></p>

Arthur Lupia

Arthur Lupia

Hal R. Varian Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan

Term: 2014-2016
<p>Arthur Lupia is the Hal R. Varian Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and research professor at its Institute for Social Research. He examines how information and institutions affect policy and politics, with a focus on how people make decisions when they lack information. He draws from multiple scientific and philosophical disciplines and uses multiple research methods. His topics of expertise include information processing, persuasion, strategic communication, and civic competence. His books include The Democratic Dilemma: Can Citizens Learn What They Need to Know? (1998); Elements of Reason: Cognition, Choice, and the Bounds of Rationality (2000); and The Cambridge Handbook of Experimental Political Science (2011).<br/></p>

Marcia McNutt

Marcia McNutt

President, National Academy of Sciences

Term: 2014-2016
<p>Marcia McNutt is a geophysicist and president of the National Academy of Sciences. From 2013 to 2016, she served as the editor-in-chief of the Science family of journals. Prior to joining Science, she was director of the United States Geological Survey (USGS) from 2009 to 2013 as one of a group of accomplished scientists who populated top government posts as part of President Obama’s “dream team.” During her tenure, the USGS responded to a number of major disasters, including earthquakes in Haiti, Chile, and Japan, and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. McNutt led a team of government scientists and engineers at BP headquarters in Houston, and directed a flow rate technical group that estimated the rate of oil discharge during the spill’s active phase. For her work on the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, she was awarded the U.S. Coast Guard’s Meritorious Service Medal, the noncombat equivalent to the Bronze Star.<br/></p>

Andrew Updegrove

Andrew Updegrove

Co-founder, Partner, Gesmer Updegrove LLP

Term: 2015-2016
<p></p><p></p><p>Andrew Updegrove is a co-founder and partner of the Boston law firm of Gesmer Updegrove LLP. Since 1988 he has served as legal counsel to over 135 standards development organizations and open source foundations, most of which he has helped structure and launch. He has been retained by many of the largest technology companies in the world to assist them in forming such He has also written and spoken extensively on the topics of consortia, standard setting and open source software, has given testimony to the United States Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission, and Congressional and State legislative committees on the same topics, and has filed “friend of the court” briefs on a pro bono basis with the Federal Circuit Court, Supreme Court, and Federal Trade Commission in support of standards development in leading standards-related litigation.</p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p>In 2002, he launched ConsortiumInfo.org, a website intended to be the most detailed and comprehensive resource on the Internet on the topics of consortia and standard setting, as well as Standards Today, an eJournal of news, ideas and analysis in the standard setting and open source areas with over 7,000 subscribers around the world. In 2005, he launched the Standards Blog. ConsortiumInfo.org serves over 10 million page views annually.</p><p>He has been a member of the United States Standards Strategy revision committee, has served on a National Academy of Sciences committee on standards-related intellectual property rights policies commissioned by the US PTO, and has received the President’s Award for Journalism from American National Standards Institute (ANSI). His current and past Board service includes the Boards of Directors of ANSI, the Linux Foundation and the Free Standards Group, and the Boards of Advisors of HL7 and Open Source for America. He is a graduate of Yale University and the Cornell University Law School.</p><p><br/></p><p></p><p></p>