Participate in Open Science

COS collaborates with and produces tools for scientists, research institutions, journals, societies, and developers. Below, explore ways to use our free services or collaborate on promoting open science.

Promote Open Science in Your Community

Researchers in any field can become COS Ambassadors. Sign up to receive information and materials to help you advocate for open science. United, we can increase openness, integrity, and reproducibility across scientific domains. Learn more or contact us to become an ambassador.

What Ambassadors Do

  • Act as local information resource about COS, the OSF, transparency, and reproducible practices
  • Represent COS at conferences and meetings
  • Grow the open science community
  • Blog experiences and join in the online conversation
  • Provide training on OSF and reproducible practices
  • Model COS swag!

Ambassadors

Andrés Montealegre
Andrés Montealegre
Universidad de los Andes
Andrey Fedorov
Andrey Fedorov
Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital
Anita Eerland
Anita Eerland
Utrecht University
Anne Allison
Anne Allison
Piedmont Virginia Community College
Brianna Marshall
Brianna Marshall
University of Wisconsin
Cameron Callaghan
Cameron Callaghan
Tulane School of Medicine
Chris Hartgerink
Chris Hartgerink
Tilburg University
Chris Lortie
Chris Lortie
National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis
Daniel Lakens
Daniel Lakens
Eindhoven University of Technology
Danielle Robinson
Danielle Robinson
Oregon Health and Science University
Eleni Castro
Eleni Castro
Harvard University
Elizabeth Page-Gould
Elizabeth Page-Gould
University of Toronto
Erica Baranski
Erica Baranski
University of California, Riverside
Erin McKiernan
Erin McKiernan
National Autonomous University of Mexico
Felix Schönbrod
Felix Schönbrodt
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
Garret Christensen
Garret Christensen
UC Berkeley Center for
Effective Global Action
George Banks
George Banks
UNC Charlotte
Grace Binion
Grace Binion
University of Oregon
Gustav Nilsonne
Gustav Nilsonne
Stockholm University
Hans Ijzerman
Hans IJzerman
VU University Amsterdam
J. Mario Siqueiros-García
J. Mario Siqueiros-García
National Autonomous University of Mexico
Jamie Field
Jamie Field
Virginia Commonwealth University
Jeremy Simon
Jeremy Simon
Brandeis University
Jim Sly
Jim Sly
Missouri State University
John Lurquin
John Lurquin
University of Colorado, Bouder
John Sakaluk
John Sakaluk
University of Victoria
Jon Grahe
Jon Grahe
Pacific Lutheran University
Judy Ruttenberg
Judy Ruttenberg
Association of Research Libraries
Kaitlyn Werner
Kaitlyn Werner
Carleton University
Kara Woo
Kara Woo
University of Washington
Karen Tonsfeldt
Karen Tonsfeldt
University of California, San Diego
Katie Corker
Katie Corker
Kenyon College
Laura Michaelson
Laura Michaelson
University of Colorado, Boulder
Mahmood Zargar
Mahmood Zargar
McGill University
Melissa McAdam Ellison
Melissa McAdam Ellison
Center for Naval Analyses
Nassar Saleh
Nassar Saleh
Queens University
Natalie Meyers
Natalie Meyers
University of Notre Dame
Nicole Janz
Nicole Janz
University of Cambridge
Norm Medeiros
Norm Medeiros
Haverford College
Richard Ball
Richard Ball
Haverford College
Richard Klein
Richard Klein
University of Florida
Rolf Zwaan
Rolf Zwaan
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Scott Sievert
Scott Sievert
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Sean Rife
Sean Rife
Murray State Univerity
Sherry Lake
Sherry Lake
University of Virginia
Stacy Shaw
Stacy Shaw
UCLA
Stephanie Zawada
Stephanie Zawada
University of Arizona
Susann Fiedler
Susann Fiedler
MPI Collective Goods Institute
Tom Hardwicke
Tom Hardwicke
University College London

Facilitate Open Science and Research Efficiency at Your Institution

COS offers free tools and services to communities of researchers and their affiliated institutions to make research more efficient, discoverable, and reproducible.

1. Set up OSF for Institutions

The Open Science Framework (OSF) is a free, secure web app that supports scientists’ research workflow from study planning and data collection, through long term preservation and sharing. OSF for Institutions expands on these features by making it easy to affiliate your research with your institution and discover other affiliated research. Learn more.

2. Affiliate ongoing research at your institution

Single-sign on (SSO) authentication between the OSF and your institution makes it easy to log in and affiliate projects. A branded, dedicated landing page for your institution acts as a central hub for all ongoing and completed research.

3. Promote the Open Science Framework

Use internal communications to invite current and new OSF users to your branded, OSF landing page. Work with us to set up email blasts, webinars, and trainings promoting open and reproducible tools, methodologies, and workflows.

4. Train your research community

Work with us to establish best practices on data management and how to integrate the OSF efficiently into your current workflow. We provide statistical and methodology consulting on topics related to reproducible research and good statistical practices.

5. See the impact of research

View project analytics on individual projects to measure impact beyond publication and citations. The OSF provides data on downloads, page views, and referring sites.

6. Share the outputs of conferences and meetings

Your researchers work hard on conference presentations and posters. OSF for Meetings enables easy sharing of slides or posters before or after a conference. Encourage your conference organizers to have it set up, or request it yourself.

Take Steps Towards Transparency

COS offers researchers tools and services to make your research better, more efficient, and more reproducible.

1. Use The Open Science Framework (OSF)

OSF is a free, secure web application for project management, collaboration, registration, and archiving. Stop losing files, improve collaboration, and integrate OSF projects with the tools you use (e.g., Dropbox, GitHub, Figshare, Dataverse). Learn more.

2. Conduct Reproducible Analyses

COS offers free statistical consulting to improve reproducible practices. Get email help on power analysis and calculating confidence intervals, individualized hangouts for learning R and GitHub, or schedule a group to be trained on OSF. Read more.

3. Preregister your studies

Preregistration increases the credibility of hypothesis testing by confirming in advance what will be analyzed and reported. For the Preregistration Challenge, one thousand researchers will win $1,000 each for publishing results of preregistered research.

4. Signal Open Practices

Badges for open practices in publications signal others that researchers value and practice open science. Some journals now offer this visual acknowledgement for open data, open materials, and preregistration. If a journal you publish in offers badges, apply. If it does not, recommend the badges program to the journal.

5. Share your presentations, materials, and data

Greater transparency means that more questions can be answered with existing data. Many openly available datasets can be found on the Open Science Framework; the Reproducibility Project: Psychology, for example, has made its data public. You can make yours public via the OSF. OSF for Meetings enables you to share slides or posters before or after a conference. Encourage your conference organizer to have it set up, or request it yourself.

Join Our Open Source Community

A natural parallel to open scientific practices is open source software. COS is a Python-based, open source development shop. You can join our mission to bring the core philosophy of open source development to science.

1. Support Open Science with Open Source Tools

The Open Science Framework (OSF), the flagship COS platform, is a web application that supports research workflow. The OSF supports: archiving and preservation of research materials and data, version control for scientific materials, registering projects (tagging a version at a particularly important point in the workflow), forking scientific materials and other incentives for sharing and open practice, and integration or linking of services through APIs.

2. Contribute to an Open Source Project

Developers can contribute to maturing projects like OSF, or to new projects such as: SciNet, a tool for extracting citation meta-data from HTML articles viewed in the browser; Pydocx, a parser that provides roundtrip conversion of .docx files to other formats such as LaTeX; SciParse, tools for parsing references from HTML snippets, and from JSON data structures generated by the Citelet; or HGrid, a web-based file management system integrating DropzoneJS and SlickGridJS.

3. Join Our Team

Developers. We love open source, science, databases, web/API development, content management systems, and Python. You should too. If so, please submit a resume and cover letter via our jobs page. Questions about the position and COS are welcome and can be sent to jobs@cos.io.

Developer internships. Same as above but in summer or part-time internship form; students will work with our developers and carve out their own open science project. Please submit a resume and cover letter via our jobs page. Questions about the position and COS are welcome and can be sent to jobs@cos.io.